This Week's Voices from Around the World

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[16 Jun 2009 | No Comment | ]

- by Mary Liston Liepold
In May we celebrated mothers all month long. (Our Mom X Mom virtual event on Facebook was such a success that we’re still celebrating.) In June we’re focusing on fathers and other men of good will, our honored partners in the pursuit of peace. At different times this month, I sat down with four peacebuilders I admire: in alphabetical order only, Michael Henderson, HawaH Kasat, Len Traubman, and Alfredo Sfeir-Younis. If you’ve visited our website lately you may have met them already, in Voices from the …

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This Week's Peace Action »

[15 Jun 2009 | No Comment | ]
Water is a precious and scarce resource: Take shorter showers or use less water all week.

Level: Personal—Peace Principle: Witness
This week’s featured story came in from Chicago, IL, USA:
After a long, not so relaxing weekend, I was really looking forward to a soothing bubble bath to recenter myself.  But after reading This Week’s Peace Action, I will go without this luxury.  And I will do so in honor of World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought.
The World Day to Combat Desertification is observed every year on 17 June. This year, the Day’s theme is “Conserving land and water = Securing our common future “.
In my …

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Voices from the Frontlines »

[11 Jun 2009 | No Comment | ]
Two Years Old and Already at Work

Nadra Mahdi
Sudan
She does not know what is the thing she carries on her shoulders. She is just 2 years old. Every day she walks with her mother for long distances carrying two bottles on her shoulders.
Fatma, her sister, now is 7 years old. She now knows that she has carried bottles of water from the age of 2 until she dies. She is from the AlAngasana tribe. They live in the AlAngasana Mountains in Baw, in Blue Nile State in Sudan.
The culture of these mountains puts all the efforts of …

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Voices from the Frontlines »

[11 Jun 2009 | No Comment | ]

Zina Bhaia
Iraq
By permission from www.thenewsgazette.com
I graduated from Baghdad University in 2002 with an English-language degree and was hired to translate English movies into Arabic, supposedly for Iraqi TV audiences, but really for Saddam’s son Oday, a crazy man I fortunately never met. After the American invasion, I worked for a French organization distributing artificial legs to Iraqis maimed in the war. My spine was curved badly from having had polio as an infant, and, for the first time in my life, walking with crutches actually helped me get that job. …

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